Description
Curved piece of bone, grey in colour, with various shades of brown. Petrified soil and other organic material present. There is also some streaks of pale green from being buried for so long. The bone shows signs of breaking down until petrification and is fragile. This item was originally identifi…
  1 Image  
Title
Mammoth bone
Category
NATURAL HISTORY
Sub-Category
FOSSIL, MAMMAL
Description
Curved piece of bone, grey in colour, with various shades of brown. Petrified soil and other organic material present. There is also some streaks of pale green from being buried for so long. The bone shows signs of breaking down until petrification and is fragile. This item was originally identified in the database as petrified wood from the Lake Babine mammoth, but was identified as mammoth bone by an archaeologist from UNBC in 2018. It was originally identified as a bone fragment in 2002 at time of original donation.
Narrative
This item came in with a mammoth bone, July 9, 2002, which was found in the Granisle area. Refer to notes for 2009.23.2 for more information on the find.
Width
13 cm at center
Length
40 cm
Units Of Measurement
Centimeters
Dimension Notes
Length & Width approx. due to fragile condition of object
Accession No.
2009.23.1
Type of Record
Museum Artifact
Images
Description
The bone looks to be the dorsal part of a rib bone. It has chunks missing from its exterior exposing the cellular internals of the bone. It is a dirty brown colour. It has significant crack in the middle of the curve. Multiple articulating faces remain visible, though some parts have broken off.
  3 Images  
Title
Mammoth Bone
Original Owner
Donald McKilligan, the Standard General Mine Developers employee who first acquired the fossil
Category
NATURAL HISTORY
Sub-Category
FOSSIL, MAMMAL
Description
The bone looks to be the dorsal part of a rib bone. It has chunks missing from its exterior exposing the cellular internals of the bone. It is a dirty brown colour. It has significant crack in the middle of the curve. Multiple articulating faces remain visible, though some parts have broken off.
Narrative
In 1971, a Noranda Bell Copper Mineuncovered mammoth remains at its Babine Lake/Granisle worksite. Former employees claim that in order to prevent the worksite being shut down by an archaelogical excavation, the remains were ordered to be bulldozed into "a nearby overburden dump". One employ, Donald McKilligan smuggled these fossils out of the worksite "in his lunch box" and these were then donated in 2002 to the Museum by his ex-wife, Colleen Carroll. There are claims that several other employees smuggled remains out of the area. There are claims that up to two dozen mammoths may have been buried at the site. At some point, Noranda notified UBC and Dr. Howard Tipper supervised a dig. General Standard - a sub contractor for Noranda - gave Tipper three days in which he ecavated the remains of one mammoth. The remains are estimated to be 34,000 years old and are now housed in the Canadia's Museum of Natural Sciences (see http://salmontrails.com/culture/granisle-museum-visitor-centre).In 2002 when the story first broke in the Interior News and when the bone was first donated to the Museum, Jane Young and other Museum staff implored other ex-employees of the work site to donate items to the Museum.For more information see: "Mammoth donation unearths archeological cover-up in Granisle", by Nicole Fitzgerald, Wednesday, July 17, 2002 and "Digging deeper into Granisle mammoth excavation", by Nicole Fitzgerald, July 31, 2002.
Height
4.75
Width
19.5
Length
47
Units Of Measurement
Centimeters
Dimension Notes
All measurements are approximate. Not at all
Accession No.
2009.23.2
Type of Record
Museum Artifact
Images