2 records – page 1 of 1.

Bulkley Valley District Hospital fonds

https://search.bvmuseum.org/link/descriptions5559
Date Range
1920-2001
Collection
Bulkley Valley District Hospital fonds
Description Level
Fonds
GMD
architectural drawing
technical drawing
textual record
graphic material
Scope and Content
Fonds is organized into seven series:
Collection
Bulkley Valley District Hospital fonds
Description Level
Fonds
GMD
architectural drawing
technical drawing
textual record
graphic material
Fonds No.
GF5
Accession No.
1986.7
1992.9
1997.51
2004.20
2007.3
2017.25
2017.36
2017.53
2020.36
Physical Description
21 cm of textual records
6 architectural drawings
1 technical drawing
3 photogarphs
Date Range
1920-2001
History / Biographical
The Bulkley Valley District Hospital was first established in 1920 and occupied a pre-existing building on the corner of Second Avenue and King Street. It housed 13 beds, an operating room, an office, a kitchen and a dining area. The hospital continued to expand throughout the decade until 1933, when its ownership was transferred from the Hospital Board to the Sisters of St. Anne, and a new building was constructed. A 30-bed wing with an emergency operating room was added in 1955. By 1968, this building was ruled obsolete and work began on a new modern facility, to be run by the province after the Sisters relinquished control. The new Bulkley Valley District Hospital was opened in 1969. A major renovation project was launched in 1973 and the original 1934 building was demolished. The formation of the Bulkley Lodge Society through the Smithers Society of Concerned Citizens in 1982 replaced the need for extended care beds in the BV District Hospital. Today, the Hospital acts as an acute care facility with 25 beds, servicing communities from Houston to Hazelton, B.C. For more detailed information on the history and development of the Hospital, see finding aid.
Custodial History
Records that were created both by the original Board of Directors (1920 – 1934) and Sisters of St. Ann (1933-1969) were passed on and kept by management until their donation to the Archives. Records in this collection from the Ladies’ Auxiliary were kept by Jean Maskiewich whose sister-in-law, Jean Kilpatrick, was the former Treasurer of the Auxiliary. Maskiewich then donated these records to the Archives.Three photographs (P7894-P7896) were found in collections in October 2020, having been submitted to the Interior News prior to 2003 and transferred to the museum at an unknown date.
Scope and Content
Fonds is organized into seven series:
1. Administrative
2. Board of Trustees
3. Sisters of St. Ann
4. Bulkley Valley District Hospital Ladies’ Auxiliary
5. Bulkley Valley District Hospital Society
6. Construction and engineering records
7. Legal records
Other records not organized under these series include a reports and orders ledger, a physicians journal and day book, donations for the Hospital’s first x-ray machine, x-ray reports, event programs, a photograph, and donations for a L.B. Warner memorial.
Subject Access
Bulkley Valley District Hospital
Sisters of St. Ann
Geographic Access
Smithers, B.C.
Notes
Many photographs of the BV District Hospital can also be found in the BVM Visual Records Collection.
Reproduction Restrictions
Some restrictions may be in place for certain records to protect fromer patients.
Type of Record
Archival Description

Documents

Bulkley Valley District Hospital fonds

Less detail

William Billeter fonds

https://search.bvmuseum.org/link/descriptions5043
Date Range
[1915-1985]
Collection
William Billeter fonds
Description Level
Fonds
GMD
textual record
technical drawing
graphic material
Scope and Content
The fonds reflects the activities of William Billeter during his lifetime and is arranged into five series:
Collection
William Billeter fonds
Description Level
Fonds
GMD
textual record
technical drawing
graphic material
Creator
William Billeter
Fonds No.
PF6
Accession No.
1984.6
1990.9
1990.93
2000.40
Physical Description
9 cm of textual records
4 negatives
Date Range
[1915-1985]
History / Biographical
William Billeter was born in Portland, Oregon, on March 16, 1895, leaving home in 1910 at the age of 15. During the depression, William worked on a fishing boat, travelling to the Bering Sea to harvest salmon stocks. Billeter met his wife Flo in Butte, Montana, where he worked in a copper mine. Shortly after, they decided to travel to Canada in search of cheap land. In Stettler, Alberta, they met Frank Gilbert and his family, who were considering settling in the Bulkley Valley. Thus, in the spring of 1920, the Billeters travelled to the Bulkley Valley, buying land in the Driftwood area.
Billeter worked as a dairy farmer, in trying conditions, shipping milk to Prince Rupert by rail for over 20 years. Come 1951, Billeter ceased producing milk so as to pursue raising beef. During this time, Billeter acted as secretary for the Smithers Farmer’s Institute. In 1953, Billeter and his wife decided to sell the farm, which was sold to Joe Schwegler. The couple moved to Smithers where Billeter worked maintaining the federal post office and police station, until he turned 70 years-old.
Billeter built two homes while living in the Bulkley Valley: one on Second Avenue and a log cabin on the hillside overlooking the Valley and farm. In the community, Billeter played an important role in building Pioneer Place and Glenwood Community Hall and helping to found the Bulkley Valley Credit Union.
On November 1974, Flo Billeter passed away at the age of 82. On December 5, 1984, William Billeter passed away at the age of 89.
Scope and Content
The fonds reflects the activities of William Billeter during his lifetime and is arranged into five series:
1. Secretary, Smithers Farmer's Institute
2. Dairy Farmer
3. Postmaster
4. Correspondence
5. Finances
Records include correspondence, invoices, cheques, various recorded accounts, newspaper clippings, dental x-rays and technical drawings.
Arrangement
Records were rearranged physically and intellectually by Manda Haligowski in October 2016 reflect to better reflect archival standards and to improve accessibility. Records are artificially arranged since original order no longer exists.
Type of Record
Archival Description

Documents

Less detail