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9 records – page 1 of 1.

Material
WOOD-CEDAR;
Description
A) Small coiled bundle of yellow cedar root. The end of one strip has been wrapped around to fasten the bundle. B) Large bundle of willow or cedar strips. Some pieces have frayed edges. The bundle was originally bound but has come undone. Roy Michell of Morricetown explained that willow strips we…
  3 Images  
Other Names
Cedar Root Strips
Cedar Strips
Willow Root Strips
Worked Wood
Category
UNCLASSIFIABLE ARTIFACTS
Sub-Category
ARTIFACT REMNANT
Description
A) Small coiled bundle of yellow cedar root. The end of one strip has been wrapped around to fasten the bundle. B) Large bundle of willow or cedar strips. Some pieces have frayed edges. The bundle was originally bound but has come undone. Roy Michell of Morricetown explained that willow strips were used in many ways. Willow strips were strung between trees on a moose trail and when the moose legs would get tangled up, it would bring the moose down all trussed up until the hunters arrived. They were also used to hang fish up to dry and on the other end of the spectrum, they were used in basketry. C) Cedar fragments, smaller and bigger strips. Unbound.
History Of Use
Chief Thomas Seymour George, Dec 21/1892 - Aug 1974; Mary Wells George, Feb 29/1900 - Oct 30/1981. Both were born in Hagwilget and married in 1915. He was the chief of the Bear tribe in the Carrier Nation. Mary was known for her leather & weaving crafts. For more information, see Historical Research file: George, Chief Thomas. These cedar root strips are from their collection. A horizontal cut is made in the base of a cedar trunk, pry the bark up & outward, strip off a section of the bark for a good length, and there is the basis for making rope or fishing line with minimum of joins. Bark stripping was carried out in the spring when the sap was running. The scar left on the tree is called a 'cat face'. Beneath the outer bark lay the thick layer of fibrous inner bark. These layers were separated with an ulna knife. The lengths of inner bark were then dried, folded into hunks & stored. When needed, it was dampened & broken down by pounding with the bark shredder to become soft & pliable. In this form it could be made into clothing, headdress, rope, fish nets, fish lines or softly shredded bark served as bedding of diapers.
Material
WOOD-CEDAR;
Units Of Measurement
Centimeters
Number Of Parts
3
Accession No.
1986.2.5 a-c
Type of Record
Museum Artifact
Images
Material
METAL/ALLOY-UNKNOWN;
Description
This wagon step has a round, flat, part with one high edge that is used to support your foot. There is a metal piece attached in the shape of a 't' it has three holes in it and two have screws through them. This part is for attaching to the wagon. Underneath it has a long piece of metal to suppo…
  2 Images  
Category
UNCLASSIFIABLE ARTIFACTS
Sub-Category
ARTIFACT REMNANT
Description
This wagon step has a round, flat, part with one high edge that is used to support your foot. There is a metal piece attached in the shape of a 't' it has three holes in it and two have screws through them. This part is for attaching to the wagon. Underneath it has a long piece of metal to support the step.
History Of Use
This wagon step was used by Cornelius Bot. Cornelius was the first person to own a carriage. He would give people rides to wherever they wanted to go. He never asked for money, he just did it out of the kindness of his own heart.
Material
METAL/ALLOY-UNKNOWN;
Height
3.3
Width
10.5
Length
19.5
Units Of Measurement
Centimeters
Accession No.
1994.5.10
Type of Record
Museum Artifact
Images
Material
MINERAL/ROCK-CHERT;
Description
A small greenish piece of worked stone.
  2 Images  
Other Names
Chert
Category
UNCLASSIFIABLE ARTIFACTS
Sub-Category
ARTIFACT REMNANT
Description
A small greenish piece of worked stone.
History Of Use
These are chert waste chips. The original tool was held in the hand with leather under it. The larger tool was then brought down upon it to flake off the right amount to create a new tool or modify an existing one.
Material
MINERAL/ROCK-CHERT;
Height
0.4
Width
2.8
Length
3.1
Units Of Measurement
Centimeters
Accession No.
1995.4.2
Type of Record
Museum Artifact
Images
Material
MINERAL/ROCK-OBSIDIAN;
Description
6 small volcanic glass flakes. The following are their dimensions: #1. 1cm long x 7mm wide #4. 2.0cm long x 1.1cm wide #2. 1cm ' x 9mm ' #5. 1.4cm ' x 1.5cm ' #3. 1.2cm ' x 7mm ' #6. 1.3cm ' x 1.4cm ' Measurements were taken at t…
  2 Images  
Other Names
Flint Pieces
Category
UNCLASSIFIABLE ARTIFACTS
Sub-Category
ARTIFACT REMNANT
Description
6 small volcanic glass flakes. The following are their dimensions: #1. 1cm long x 7mm wide #4. 2.0cm long x 1.1cm wide #2. 1cm ' x 9mm ' #5. 1.4cm ' x 1.5cm ' #3. 1.2cm ' x 7mm ' #6. 1.3cm ' x 1.4cm ' Measurements were taken at the widest points due to odd shapes.
History Of Use
The process of making a flake tool resulted in an accumulation of waste flakes of all sizes. Some of the larger flakes with sharp edges were used as a cutting or scraping tool, while others were touched up with secondary flaking to sharpen or reshape an
Material
MINERAL/ROCK-OBSIDIAN;
Units Of Measurement
Centimeters
Dimension Notes
see Object Description for all 6 measurements
Accession No.
1995.3.1-6
Type of Record
Museum Artifact
Images
Material
MINERAL/ROCK-CHERT;
Description
A greenish piece of chert.
  2 Images  
Title
Chert
Category
UNCLASSIFIABLE ARTIFACTS
Sub-Category
ARTIFACT REMNANT
Description
A greenish piece of chert.
History Of Use
These are chert waste chips. The original tool was held in the hand with leather under it. The larger tool was then brought down upon it to flake off the right amount to create a new tool or modify an existing one.
Material
MINERAL/ROCK-CHERT;
Units Of Measurement
Centimeters
Dimension Notes
See Object Description for measurements
Accession No.
1995.4.1
Photograph or Negative No.
None
Type of Record
Museum Artifact
Images
Material
MINERAL/ROCK-GABBRO;
Description
a) A medium size stone that just fits your hand. Shaped like a small hatchet head. One end is narrow, opposite end has been shaped like the cutting edge of an adze. Relatively smooth with the odd rough spot. b) A long, narrow, black stone shaped like an axe head. One end is a bit wider than the…
  2 Images  
Category
NATURAL HISTORY
Sub-Category
ARTIFACT REMNANT
Description
a) A medium size stone that just fits your hand. Shaped like a small hatchet head. One end is narrow, opposite end has been shaped like the cutting edge of an adze. Relatively smooth with the odd rough spot. b) A long, narrow, black stone shaped like an axe head. One end is a bit wider than the other. One side is smooth with the odd rough spot but the other side is completely rough. Article has a concave face.
History Of Use
This artifact is from Gabbro stone, which is related to Basalt. It has the appearance of being a fist axe or adze. It was designed to be held in the hand. The adze was one of the most important tools until sawed and planed lumber came into use. They were used to cut up food, digging like a hoe, a hide scraper and the list goes on. It cannot be documented what this artifact was specifically used for because of its versatility. A fist adze could also be used for splinting. Bone smashed with a hammer stone produced long splinters suitable for making into awls, needles, fish hooks and other barbs.
Material
MINERAL/ROCK-GABBRO;
Height
a) 3.5 b) 2`
Width
a) 5 b) 6.5
Length
a) 13.5 b) 20
Units Of Measurement
Centimeters
Accession No.
1974.106.9 b-c
Type of Record
Museum Artifact
Images
Material
ANIMAL-SKIN;
Description
Light colour deer hide; triangular in shape; soft and tanned; one side is smooth, the other rough with evidence of the scraping.
  2 Images  
Other Names
DEER HIDE
Category
UNCLASSIFIABLE ARTIFACTS
Sub-Category
ARTIFACT REMNANT
Description
Light colour deer hide; triangular in shape; soft and tanned; one side is smooth, the other rough with evidence of the scraping.
History Of Use
Chief Thomas George 1892-1974; Mary Wells George 1900-1981. Both were born in Hagwilget and married in 1915. Thomas was known as 'Gisdewe' and was a house chief of the Gidimt'en Clan of the Witsuwit'en. Mary was well known for her leather crafts and traditional food. For more info, see Historical Research file, George, Chief Thomas. The hide is stretched and scraped of all its hair and fat. This is done when it's either really cold or hot. The hide is then smoked to tan it. The amount of scraping is what makes the hide soft.
Material
ANIMAL-SKIN;
Units Of Measurement
Centimeters
Dimension Notes
artifact has an odd shape: 42cm x 42cm x 33cm x 2cm
Accession No.
1986.2.3
Type of Record
Museum Artifact
Images

Al Bannister and Bert Walkland with Ford car

https://search.bvmuseum.org/permalink/descriptions1938
Date Range
ca 1923
Collection
BVM visual record collection
Description Level
Item
GMD
graphic material
  1 Image  
Collection
BVM visual record collection
Description Level
Item
GMD
graphic material
Fonds No.
C2
Item No.
P1177
Accession No.
1982.30
Physical Description
1 photograph: sepia;14.4 x 8.5 cm
Scan Resolution
96 dpi
Date Range
ca 1923
Subject Access
Bannister, Al
Notes
Written on the back is: "Bert Walkland, A. Bannister, Ford bought from Bill Henry 1923, Price $740.00"
Type of Record
Archival Description
Images
Material
MINERAL/ROCK-ARGILLITE;
Description
A small half moon flake of black worked stone. The bottom length is almost flat, and has been chipped to form a thin sharp serrated edge. The opposite side has a smooth, flat surface. Both ends are slightly rounded with one having a small sharp point.
Category
UNCLASSIFIABLE ARTIFACTS
Sub-Category
ARTIFACT REMNANT
Description
A small half moon flake of black worked stone. The bottom length is almost flat, and has been chipped to form a thin sharp serrated edge. The opposite side has a smooth, flat surface. Both ends are slightly rounded with one having a small sharp point.
History Of Use
This worked stone is a 'scraper'. It was a tool of great variety and multiple uses that the full range of its function is difficult unless you lived and worked in that environment. Besides scraping fur from a hide or meat from a bone, they also served as a planer to shape wood, shave a bone to a point, remove outer skin from plants, scrap bark off and the list goes on. Some were hafted like knife handles, some were used directly in the hand or by the fingers: some were flat, some were on edge. This stone is argillite, sometimes called black slate. It is found from the Hazeltons, up the Kispiox Valleys into Mexiadan and north.
Material
MINERAL/ROCK-ARGILLITE;
Height
0.5
Width
2.7
Length
5.5
Units Of Measurement
Centimeters
Accession No.
1974.0106.0009.2
Photograph or Negative No.
None
Type of Record
Museum Artifact

9 records – page 1 of 1.